Reviewing the Highland Council’s Commercial Waste Service

29th May 2019

The Highland Council has commissioned us to undertake a review of its commercial waste service in order to understand the opportunities for improvements in cost-efficiency and delivery.

Located in the Scottish Highlands, the Highland Council area is the largest local government area in the UK. The council provides a large-scale commercial waste service, collecting recycling and residual waste from around 5,000 businesses. Our commercial waste review comes as the Highland Council seeks to understand both the cost-efficiency of the current service and its potential for expansion.

The review will include a market analysis and a pricing review. The market analysis will make use of economic and environmental data, as well as GIS mapping, to provide the council with a picture of its place in the commercial waste collection market, in terms of the proportions of both Highlands businesses served and waste collected. The pricing review will include an assessment of different service options in order to show how the council could either reduce its delivery costs or improve its service for the same costs. It will also provide advice on the council’s pricing strategy, enabling a flexible and competitive approach to price setting.

Our Project Manager Daniel Card said:

“We’re really pleased to build upon our relationship with the Highland Council, which we have previously helped in a review of its service commissioning options. The current work allows us to bring them our industry leading expertise in commercial waste collection, and to hopefully make what is already a great service even better.”

The Highland Council is the latest of many UK local authorities and waste management companies whom we have helped develop commercial waste services. We have also undertaken commercial waste studies at a national level, most recently providing advice to the Welsh Government on the commercial waste implications of Part 4 of the Environment (Wales) Act 2016.

Picture courtesy of fw42, Flickr, CC-BY-2.0.